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2283 Search Results for "annual conference"

  • Leadership Through the Looking Leadership Through the Looking Glass: A Tale of Two Teacher-Leaders

    • From: Krista_Rundell
    • Description:

      On March 15, 2014, a friend and fellow ASCD Emerging LeaderAllison Rodman, and I had an opportunity to present at the ASCD Annual Conference in Los Angeles, California.  The topic was "Teacher-Leadership" and the goal was to organize our ideas in the Ignite format.


      While we were both used to speaking at conferences and in front of large groups of people, neither of us had experience with this format.  Ignite limits the presenter to 20 slides, each on a 30-second timer.  This organizes the presentation to a manageable five minutes, but forces the presenter to remain focused in order to efficiently convey the true message of the presentation.  The task at-hand was exciting, challenging, and daunting.  Could we actually do this and be successful?

       

      Allie and I live about an hour away from one another, but our crazy schedules did not allow us to meet in person to organize our ideas or to practice.  We worked through google docs and phone calls to compile the PowerPoint, divided up ownership of the slides, then finally were able to practice together just 30 minutes prior to the actual session.

       

      Other Emerging Leader-friends were also part of this session, presenting their own insights into Teacher-Leadership.  We jested that we'd be the only ones to show up to the session but that at least we'd be there to support one another.  Our jokes became obsolete when the room filled to capacity of 150 people and others had to continually be turned away due to lack of seating and safety regulations.  Needless to say, our nerves were getting the better of us!

       

      I am incredibly proud of the work that Allie and I did leading up to that presentation, as well as the actual presentation itself.  We shared our professional experiences with one another, divulged our fears with one another, laughed with one other, learned from one other, and ultimately, achieved success together.  We challenged ourselves, stretched beyond our comfort zone, and drew on the wisdom of others for guidance (shout out to Alina Davis!).  Now we have a story to give back to those who come after us.

       

      We are teacher-leaders.

       

      P.S. Allie organized our slides and spoken words into a beautiful blog post on her site, The Learning Loop.  Please visit and enjoy!

    • Blog post
    • 6 days ago
    • Views: 94
  • Leader to Leader News: April 2 Leader to Leader News: April 2014

  • Alternatives to Standardized T Alternatives to Standardized Tests: Building a Comprehensive Assessment Plan

    • From: Elliott_Seif
    • Description:

      As a high school teacher, I used an array of diverse assessments to measure and evaluate student achievement and success. Many varied components would go into each student’s grades and narratives – test and quiz results, the quality of projects, writings and self-reflections, observations of students, and judgments regarding effort, growth, and class participation. Given the multiple student cognitive abilities, attitudes, character traits, and strengths and problems, it would have been foolish of me to use only one type of measure to determine a students’ success in my class.

       

      Given that multiple types of assessments such as the ones I used above are used by most teachers, one would expect that appropriate, multiple assessment approaches would be also used to assess school and district success. Thus, it is surprising that “one size fits all” standardized tests, with their major emphasis on multiple choice-short answer questions, are touted as the major, and often the only way to judge school success, student achievement, and even teacher effectiveness.

       

      Unfortunately, the sole use of these traditional tests pose many problems for assessing actual student knowledge, skills, abilities, talents and interests. First, many educators and lay people suggest that standardized tests often do not do a good job of measuring the purported skills associated with them. For example, as recently pointed out by a New York State teacher in a NY Times op-ed piece, the New York English Language Arts test questions do “a poor job of testing reading comprehension”. A student’s answers to the questions on this test have “little bearing on [his or her] reading ability and yet [have] huge stakes for students, teachers, principals and schools”[i]. Some students also might be good readers but do poorly on the reading test because of their poor test-taking skills.

       

      Second, standardized tests have limited use in evaluating whether students have learned many of the most important skills required for college work or for living in a 21st century world, such as interest in learning, motivation to learn, research and study skills, coherent writing abilities, effective oral communication skills, project and problem-based development skills, problem finding and question asking, the ability to apply learning to authentic situations, scientific investigation skills, “deep” thinking, student “grit”, and the development of each individual student’s talents and abilities.

       

      In addition, the tests usually provide schools and teachers with limited, if any, feedback to help them figure out how to improve teaching and learning. And, unfortunately, they also have a number of negative side effects, such as increasing sterile test-prep activities, narrowing the curriculum, increasing student anxiety and frustrations, and reducing student interest in learning. Many of our best teachers write about how the emphasis on testing plays havoc with their curriculum, the interest and motivation of their students, and their joy of teaching. Some have even left the teaching profession altogether because of their school or district emphasis on preparing for standardized tests.

       

      As opposition to the use of these tests increases, and a greater understanding of their limitations and negative consequences develops, it is imperative that opponents to standardized testing suggest alternatives. In fact, there should be many varied assessments used to determine school and district success, just as there are many and varied types of educational goals, results, and students. This is a very different paradigm from the “one size fits all” standardized testing results model of measuring success. So, described briefly below are some examples of types of measures that might be combined into an assessment plan useful for judging district and school success, student achievement, and the school or district conditions that limit or reinforce success. The first number of measures are designed to measure output – achievement and successes of students, their involvement and participation in multiple types of activities, perceptions of stakeholders in how the school is meeting their needs, and so on. The second set of measures focus on input: characteristics of student population, conditions under which students learn, amount of resources available, the quality of curriculum and teaching, and others.

       

      Assessing Output:

      Achievement, Successes, Activity Involvement, and Perceptions

       

      Student graduation data

      What do students do when they graduate, where do they go and how successful are they both during their time with us and after they leave us?

      In analyzing school success, data should be regularly collected on the % of students who graduate and what they do after graduation (types and names of colleges and universities attended, financial aid obtained, military enlistees, technical school attendees, etc.); what % of those who attend college graduate and why do they drop out; college majors. Student data also should include surveys and interviews with graduates to find out their levels of satisfaction with their K-12 school programs;

       

      Mission-related achievement data

      How well do our students meet the mission of our school or district?

      Student data should be collected and analyzed that demonstrate achievement and success based on mission-related goals. For example, a school specializing in the visual arts might collect data on the type of artwork students complete and a sampling of student portfolios; a school with an emphasis on music may focus assessments around the types of student performances given by students and the skill level of its music students. Vo-Tech schools might collect data on the types of training received by each student, their post high school plans and career goals, their job placements and acceptance levels into advanced programs.

       

      Report card results

      How successful are our students, based on the results of their daily and yearly work?

      We know that the best predictors of student achievement and success lie with how well students do in their classes and in the recommendations of teachers and others in the school. We therefore need to make sure that each school or district develop specific, “standards-based” report cards, built around measures of 21st century goals, that reflect how well students succeed and grow in their classes and courses. Report cards should be broken down into specific cognitive and social expectations, with ratings that use levels of achievement as well as grades. Narrative comments convey specific information to parents-guardians about the strengths of individual children and areas that need improvement.

       

      Report card data can be summarized to provide a picture of how well the school or district is doing to meet the needs of its students. Randomly selected report cards, along with narrative comments, can also be collected and shared.

       

      Cornerstone-graduation project(s) results

      How well do our students complete “cornerstone” projects that both develop and assess core 21st century skills?

      Cornerstone projects consist of research projects and “authentic” performance tasks that culminate in presentations and exhibitions and demonstrate in-depth understanding of ideas, the ability to use 21st century skills, and the ability to transfer and apply learning. Students who are able to develop questions around their interests or suggested topics, conduct research, read and comprehend, write essays and research papers, and make presentations to others demonstrate an understanding of content and competence in using significant skills.

       

      Cornerstone project results at different school levels demonstrate progress towards the development of these skills as well as final mastery of them.

       

      Student plans for the future

      What are student plans for the future?

      Every student should be required to develop a plan for his or her future, indicating their next steps after graduating from high school and their more visionary goals for the future. Part of the development of a plan should include research about future educational goals, career options and choices. A summary of these plans is an important indicator of school and district success.

       

      Student portfolios

      What is the comprehensive nature of individual student work?

      Portfolios - collections of student work - help us to assess actual student work and incorporate “real learning” into the assessment process, not the artificial, “out of context” kind of learning assessed through standardized tests. Portfolios are also individualized and customized to demonstrate an individual’s nuanced and varied skill levels, talents, abilities, and interests. Today, with Internet capability, an individual student’s best writing and/or artwork, project results, tests, self-reflections, plans for the future, and other student work can be scanned and placed electronically into portfolios.

       

      Students should be asked to develop portfolios of their work throughout their K-12 experience. Sample portfolios, or parts of portfolios, can be used to illustrate the types of work students are doing within the school or district, and how well a school or district is helping students master key 21st century knowledge and skills.

       

      Survey-focus group data

      What do parents, students and teachers think about us?

      In this day and age of the Internet, it is relatively easy to develop, post, and summarize survey data. Every school and district should collect data from parents, students and teachers at least once a year, and then use the data to review its programs, applaud its strengths, and figure out ways to improve what it does[ii].

       

      What do graduates and dropouts think about us?

      Once students leave school and move on to colleges and other post high-school experiences, they have greater perspective on their experiences and can often provide valuable insights into the strengths of a school program and “needs improvement” areas. Data from graduates should be sought after, even if it is often difficult to collect.

       

      Attempts should be made to collect and analyze data from dropouts, even if this data might be difficult to collect, in order to indicate why they dropped out of school and therefore suggest ways to help other students stay in school.

       

      Student reflections

      How do students view our school? What do they see as our positive and negative features?

      Students who will be leaving one school to go to another school within the district (e.g. from elementary to middle school) or leaving a school to transfer to a school outside the district, or graduating from high school should be the focus of special attention when it comes to surveys and data collection. These students should be asked to reflect on their school experiences and focus on what they perceive as the strengths of the school they are leaving, the major learnings resulting from their school experiences, and suggestions for improving their learning experience. This data should be collected, analyzed and shared.

       

      Community service and field-based activities

      What are our students’ opportunities to connect with and apply their learning to the outside world?

      How do students provide service to the community? How do students connect with the outside world via field trips, career days, and so on? How do outside individuals and groups provide services to and work with students within a school? These and other similar questions should be part of data collection that is shared and used to provide feedback on connections to real world, outside resources.

       

      Extra-curricular, support, or enrichment activities

      What opportunities are there for students to participate in extra-curricular, support and enrichment activities? How much do our students take advantage of extra-curricula, support and enrichment activities?

      “Extra curricular” activities provide opportunities for students to explore and learn about a variety of options that are beyond academics. What extra-curricular activities are available? Data should be available that indicates which students are partake of which extra-curricular activities, and how often they do so.

       

      In a similar vein, are their support and enrichment activities available for students? Data should indicate which students participate in these and why.

       

      Assessing Input:

      Conditions, Culture, Teaching, Curriculum, Resources,

       

      School and district student population, resource availability and conditions

      What are the characteristics of our student population? What resources do we have available to support our teachers and students? What school or district conditions help or hinder us in meeting achievement goals?

      This data helps us to understand the characteristics of the school, district and student population, and resource adequacy, needs problems and challenges. The data include information about student populations, such as ELL, special education, identified gifted populations; the number of students on free or reduced lunch. Other data includes the % of students who drop out of a school or district before graduation and the reasons why they leave; % who are “lifers” within the same school or district, % of students who are absent 10 or more days a year, % of students given suspensions and other discipline data, and mobility rates.

       

      District and school information include, among other things, resources available for technology, supplies, materials and other needs; class sizes; adequacy of library-media centers, art-music, and extra curricular programs; and support personnel available (NTA’s, nurses, counselors, community laiasons).

       

      Curricular programs and instructional activities

      What are the common types of curricular programs and instructional activities used in classrooms?

      One part of a school or district assessment plan might include examples of the kinds of curriculum, teaching and learning experiences that are incorporated into classrooms and other activities. Suppose, for example, that the school or district promotes inquiry learning. Do teachers in the district use an inquiry learning model in their classrooms? If yes, what does learning look like? What are the essential features of the mathematical curriculum? The reading-language arts curriculum? Are there any special programs in place (e.g. leveled books, writing process, deep learning, competitions) that provide the opportunity for a different type of learning experience for students?

       

      School and program reviews

      How can we increase the amount of “objective” assessment data in order to determine our successes and improve our programs?

      When I was on the staff of the Bucks County Intermediate Unit, an educational service agency in Bucks County, PA, we conducted a number of program reviews for our constituent districts each year. We would enlist a number of teachers, administrators, and experts from across the county and the area to spend three days in a district examining and analyzing all or part of the district’s program. Our final report would list the strengths and needs of the program, and also make suggested recommendations for improving the program.

       

      These types of reviews are extremely valuable for a school or district, especially since an outside agency is conducting the review. It provide a wealth of objective information and data, along with suggestions for improvement, that help to assess a program and provide the impetus for making changes.

       

      Building a Comprehensive Assessment Plan (CAP)

       

      Just as we should expect teachers to build a comprehensive assessment plan to measure student success and achievement in their classes, so should we expect schools and districts to build a Comprehensive Assessment Plan (CAP) that measures both output and input: a broad array of types of achievement, successes, involvement, perceptions, conditions, culture, and resources. The plan should both assess student achievement, growth, and development, and also be useful in improving school conditions and success in the future.

       

      The selection of a set of a core set of assessments, built into a Comprehensive Assessment Plan, may be best determined by each school or district, depending on its resources, options, and viewpoints. My own view is that a combination of student population and school and district conditions-resource data, strong report card and student portfolio data, cornerstone project results, and surveys of and reflections from current students and graduates will provide significant and important data on how well a school or district is doing as well as the conditions under which schools, districts and teachers operate.

       

      In today’s world of e-mails, Internet surveys, smartphones, computers, tablets, much of this data would be relatively easy to collect. Many of these measures, taken together, can become part of a holistic school-district annual report card, presented by a principal or superintendent to school boards and available to the general public. They can be used to identify problems that need to be addressed. They present a much more nuanced picture of how well a school is doing, the qualities of student graduates, what issues a school or district are facing, and what steps need to be taken to improve the results.

       

      Unfortunately, a broad, varied array of assessment data just doesn’t get collected and developed by itself. A school or district needs to assign someone who is responsible for the development, collection, and analysis of this complex data. The person responsible might even be part of a collaborative, regional effort. The development of this more comprehensive approach will also take time to develop, and a long-term goal should be to enable every school and district to develop a significant assessment process for judging success with students and the conditions and resources necessary for success.

       

      How Federal and State Officials Can Help This Assessment Process

       

      Here are some ways that state and federal officials can provide support for a the use of a much more comprehensive assessment process:

       

      • Encourage schools and districts to collect and synthesize a wide variety of data, provide funding, resources and examples to help them;

       

      • Provide examples and models of report cards, surveys, cornerstone assessments, portfolios, and the like. Provide the technical means for collecting and analyzing data from these examples and models.

       

      • Provide support for school, district, or regionally-based individuals to be hired to build assessment systems, organize data collection, and prepare summary reports around data.

       

      • Encourage schools and districts to develop their own mix of data alone or collaboratively with others, develop new measures, and share their methodology with others;

       

      • Forbid the use of a single number to describe a school or district’s success;

       

      • Encourage the development of data summaries that are easy to understand and posted for the community to see;

       

      • Encourage schools and districts to develop a wide variety of ways to use data as feedback and to experiment and find solutions to problems that arise from the data, including curriculum adaptations, community liaisons, ways to motivate students to stay in school, and so on.

       

      • Encourage high performing schools and districts to share what they do that makes them high performing, especially when they have a significant number of students that need special help and attention.

       

      • Provide support for professional development that enables staff to review and draw conclusions from data; encourage professional development to develop potential solutions to problems discovered through data collection.

       

      • Encourage school and district experimentation with potential solutions, even if they lead to failure (that’s how we learn).  

       

       

      Ultimately, a trust in a decentralized assessment process, a belief in the value of multiple, diverse assessments to measure school and district success, along with a combination of strong leadership at all levels, will provide the necessary impetus to move us away from the primary reliance on standardized tests to assess student, school and teacher success. We should be moving towards the use of varied sets of data that provide nuanced, helpful pictures of success and student achievement and help to improve the conditions of learning. Let us hope that we move in the right direction soon, because the current direction is leading us away from the kinds of education that our students need to prepare for living in a 21st century world.

       

      -------------------------

       

      Elliott Seif, Ph.D. is a long time educator, author, consultant, educational advocate, and trainer. If you are interested in further examining ways to improve teaching and learning and help to prepare students to live in a 21st century world, read more his blogs on ASCD Edge and go to:  www.era3learning.org

       

       

       



      [i] Elizabeth Phillips, We Need to Talk About the Test: The Problem With the Common Core, The New York Times op-ed page, April 9, 2014.

      [ii] A High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) is available free of charge from the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy at Indiana University. Go to:

      http://ceep.indiana.edu/hssse/index.html

    • Blog post
    • 1 week ago
    • Views: 120
  • School Unrest-Civil Disobedien School Unrest-Civil Disobedience

    • From: Doug_Wycoff
    • Description:

       

      **This story is an excerpt from the book, Classroom Classics, coauthored by me and my longtime teaching colleague, Bob Mandell. The book is available at: https://www.createspace.com/4273928

       

      School Unrest-Civil Disobedience

      I graduated from high school in 1964 and went on to a large university in the southwest from 1964 to 1968, majoring in History and English. During the last semester of my senior year I was accepted into a special student teaching program cosponsored by the university and the local public school system. It was a pilot program that placed student teachers on team teaching teams from grades 7 through 12. I was assigned to the 12th grade team at Monzano Senior High School, a large school in the suburbs. My two teammates were Jerry and Melissa. We were scheduled to teach three senior classes in the fall of 1968 under the supervision of two experienced English teachers who had taught for many years at Monzano.

      My 12th grade team spent the spring semester preparing for our student teaching the following fall. Long range unit plans, weekly lesson plans and daily lesson plans were hashed out and revised. Since the decade of the 60’s was caught up in the turbulence of the Civil Rights movement, we focused our planning on the concept of non-violent means of protesting against social injustice, We incorporated the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi, father of the Indian independence movement, Dr. Martin Luther King, social activist in the American Civil Rights movement, as well as, the somewhat violent nature of the Black Panther Party and the Mississippi Freedom Marches. We also brought in the teachings of Henry David Thoreau, the 19th century American author and philosopher of the Transcendental Movement.

      When school opened in the fall, we eagerly and enthusiastically greeted our students at Monzano. We were convinced that we would make an impact on their lives even though we were not much older than they were. They were excited about being taught by young student teachers and welcomed us into their classrooms, ready to absorb knowledge we imparted to them. The first grading period passed and everything went smoothly. Our mentoring teachers and the administrators of the school were pleased with our work.

      Along about the middle of October, it came time for Monzano High School to celebrate its annual Homecoming. Classrooms were decorated with school colors, plans were made for the Homecoming dance on Friday night and there was much anticipation about the big Homecoming game to be played against a rival school on Saturday afternoon. However, on the Friday before Homecoming week the football coach told the team that they were not to attend the dance because he wanted them to be well rested for the game. Needless to say, the players were down and the entire student body was up in arms about the coach’s decision. When school was dismissed that Friday afternoon, there was a lot of grumbling as students headed home for the weekend.

      During the weeks prior to the week of Homecoming, the seniors in our classes had read and studied Thoreau’s essay “Civil Disobedience”. They also had exposure to Gandhi’s concept of “satyagraha” and Martin Luther King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”. All of this was in keeping with our unit on peaceful and non-violent rebellion. Neither I, nor my two teaching colleagues had any idea what was in store for us when the students returned to school on the Monday of Homecoming week.

      When our students reported to class first period on Monday, we noticed a lot of whispering and low chatter among them, all the while keeping us out of hearing range. This went on in our other two classes as well. Students throughout the entire school seemed to be quietly buzzing about something in the hallways between classes and in the lunchroom at noon. This continued throughout the school day on Tuesday. My colleagues and I thought something was up, but we had no idea what.

      The school day began as usual on Wednesday. Fifteen minutes into third period, around 10:30, our entire class got up and walked out. Not only did our students walk out, but the entire school as well! By 10:25, the whole student body was assembled on the lawn in front of the school. The students had made a huge banner that read” LET THE FOOTBALL TEAM GO TO THE HOMECOMING DANCE!” The banner was hung between two trees on the lawn in front of the school. Another banner held by students read” NOT FAIR FOR FOOTBALL PLAYERS NOT TO ATTEND HOMECOMING DANCE!” The principal, Mr. Duncan, was on the front lawn speaking with the students when he abruptly turned and headed back inside the school. The next thing we heard over the public address system was” Mr. Wycoff and his 12th grade team, report to the principal’s office immediately.” I remember turning to my two colleagues and saying,” We could be getting fired before we even start our careers.”

      As we filed into Mr. Duncan’s office, we were greeted by other administrators and other school officials. Also present was the head football coach and his coaching staff. Mr. Duncan turned to us and said” it is my understanding that the organizers of this school wide walkout are seniors in your classes. It is also my understanding that the idea for this school wide disruption stems from lessons about civil disobedience you have been teaching in your classes. The question now before us is how we are going to solve this situation and get these students back to class.” Addressing me personally, Mr. Duncan said,” Mr. Wycoff, as the leader of your teaching team, what do you have to say?”

      I realized that this would be my first test as a teacher and I responded quickly. “Mr. Duncan, I said, I think you have to admit that the seniors who organized this walkout did so in a great way. They were able to spread the word throughout the entire student body without anybody, teachers or administrators, knowing what was coming. And you have to admit that the timing of the protest was perfect-the entire student body walked out at exactly the same time. I think all of us have to give credit to the students on how they have gone about their protest. They didn’t stage a food fight or riot during lunch or been violent in any way. I think they should be commended for putting into action what they have learned in the classroom. Their only concern is not having the football team be able to attend and have fun at the dance this Friday night. I really think that a compromise would make the students happy”. I turned to the football coach and said,” Coach, the dance is scheduled from 7:00 PM until 11:00PM. Let the football players attend the dance for the first two hours and then leave. That way they can enjoy the homecoming dance and still get a good night’s sleep and  be rested for the game on Saturday.”The coach and his staff agreed, Mr. Duncan and the other administrators agree, and most importantly, the students agreed. The students went back to class and the educational process continued.

      When my teammates and I returned to our classroom, our students greeted us with cheers and thanked us for sticking up for them. The kids had a great time at the dance on Friday night and the following afternoon the football team beat their arch rivals from Sandia High School 42-7. I know that the seniors and other students of Monzano Senior High have never forgotten Homecoming in 1968.

      **This story is an excerpt from our book, Classroom Classics. The book is available at: https://www.createspace.com/4273928

    • Blog post
    • 4 weeks ago
    • Views: 260
  • Upcoming presentation April 12 Upcoming presentation April 12 at Dowling College

    • From: John_Genova
    • Description:

      My research has earned me an invitation to participate in a panel at Dowling College’s Ninth Annual Practical Research Symposium.  The title of the seminar is Educational Competitiveness in a Globalized World.  I will be presenting his research on educational leadership preparation.  Participants in this conference represent business, health care, education, and related fields.  The Annual Conference seeks to explore the processes, actions, challenges and outcomes of learning, teaching, and training in social agencies.  Dr. Frank Chong, current President of Santa Rosa Junior College, and past deputy Assistant Secretary for Community Colleges at the United States Department of Education will deliver the keynote address.

      See the link below for more information!

      http://www.internationalprofessor.com/dowling/symposium2014.htm

    • Blog post
    • 4 weeks ago
    • Views: 159
  • Reflections on ASCD Conference Reflections on ASCD Conference, 2014

    • From: Mark_Barnes
    • Description:
      ASCD authors from left: Mike Fisher, Bill Sterrett, Mark Barnes

       

      The ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show in Los Angeles attracted over 9,000 educators from around the world. The conference featured amazing keynote speakers, like Daniel Pink and Sir Ken Robinson, and many remarkable sessions and roundtable discussions by authors and K-20 education experts.

      Hundreds of vendors shared astonishing products, books and services that help educators improve teaching and learning in their schools. Conference host, ASCD, provided author talks, book signings and engaging receptions for attendees and presenters.

      Professional and personal engagement

      For me, the best part of the ASCD Conference was the professional and personal interaction. The conference gave me four days to see people in my Personal Learning Network -- many of whom I'd never met face to face -- and to reunite with colleagues and friends I don't see very often.

      I have been social network friends with Bill Sterrett and Mike Fisher (pictured above), for years. At the ASCD Conference, not only did I meet them in person for the first time, we presented in a roundtable discussion about ASCD Arias, broke bread together and brainstormed ideas for future education projects.

      At the conference, I also presented with longtime Twitter friends, Kristen Swanson, Steven Anderson, Tom Whitby, Nick Provenzano and Kim Sivick. Because we live in different states, I rarely see these people outside of cyberspace (we do hang out on Google+ occasionally), so the ASCD Conference gave us a chance to spend valuable time together in person.

      There is nothing quite like a major education conference to refuel your engines and provide powerful information and tools to take back to the classroom.

      For me, though, the ASCD Conference was about fellowship. Our PLNs provide an amazing group of people, with whom we have a unique kinship. Meeting them in person adds to that relationship, making it even better than it already was.

      Thanks ASCD for an amazing weekend. Of course, the LA sunshine didn't hurt.

      Mark Barnes is an education author and consultant and the publisher of Brilliant or Insane. Follow Mark on Twitter here.

      cross posted at www.brilliant-insane.com

    • Blog post
    • 1 month ago
    • Views: 255
  • EduEarthQuake EduEarthQuake

    • From: Michael_Fisher
    • Description:

      '080630-1010560' photo (c) 2008, Waifer X - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

      

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      I’m sitting in the Detroit airport waiting for my final leg home. There’s so much to think about after an ASCD conference and so much that impacts my professional practice and my professional partnerships. I love that environment--so much growth and collegial conversation over the course of just a few short days. There’s nothing like it!


      I was part-serious and part-joking this morning about the EduEarthQuake. While I was jolted out of bed, my first thought was to tweet out with the #ASCD14 hashtag versus any emergency decision I might have made. I guess that’s the power of being a part of something so awesome that you believe it can rock the world.


      I love that the entire mood across the conference was one of hope, one of appreciating others’ perspectives, one of discovering the best of what we can do for our students.


      So I’m thinking now about aftershocks. How are you going to continue the quake when you get back home? How are you going to rock your students’ worlds? How are you going to be so EduAwesome that everybody around you feels it?


      I hope all of you are feeling as empowered as I am tonight. I loved my time with you and am setting my sights on Houston in 2015, with a detour to Orlando for the ASCD Fall Conference in October.


      Rock the world, folks. Be an EduEarthQuake when you return!

       

      @fisher1000 on Twitter

    • Blog post
    • 1 month ago
    • Views: 269
  • #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic's

    • From: Kyle_Steichen
    • Description:
    • 1 month ago
    • Views: 82
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  • #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic's

    • From: Kyle_Steichen
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    • 1 month ago
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  • #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic #ASCD14 Tweet Up at Trader Vic's

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