Differentiated Instruction

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In differentiated instruction, teachers act on the premise that students need to be engaged in instruction through different learning modalities, appealing to differing interests using varied rates and complexities of instruction. Join the group and share your knowledge or questions—and feel free to post notifications of coming events, resources, or other content useful for educators. Here are some helpful resources:

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Most Recent Group Videos

    • 2014 Annual Conference: Nancy Frey

    • ASCD author Nancy Frey discusses what educators can do right now to help improve student achievement. Catch Nancy's presentation at ASCD's 2014 Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 15-17. 
    • 2014 Annual Conference & Exhibit Show: Mark Barnes

    • ASCD author Mark Barnes discusses what educators can do right now to help improve student achievement. Catch Mark's presentation at ASCD's 2014 Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 15-17. 
    • Why Power Standards? Why now?

    • View Hannah's channel on YouTube: http://tinyurl.com/hg-youtube Dr. Robert Marzano calculated 3,500 benchmarks spread across 14 different content areas and stated, “you would have to change schooling from K – 12 to K – 22" to encompass everything. Many school districts use research-based processes to select a safety net of consistent Power Standards, and utilize additional learning expectations as supporting standards.
    • Meet the Attendees: Torian White

    • Torian White, an assistant principal in Georgia, talks about a teacher that made a difference in his life and how it affected him. Meet educators like Torian at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 16-18, 2013, in Chicago, Ill.
    • Meet the Presenters: Sandra Day O'Connor

    • Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor discusses the importance of teaching civics. Catch her presentation live at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 17, 2013, in Chicago, Ill. 
    • 2013 Annual Conference: Meet the Presenters, Carol Dweck

    • Author Carol Dweck discusses the importance of a growth mindset. Catch her presentation live at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 16, 2013, in Chicago, Ill. 
    • 2013 Annual Conference: Meet the Presenters: Robert Marzano

    • ASCD author Robert Marzano discusses "Our Time" -- how we know more than ever about what makes schooling effective.  Catch Bob's presentation live at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 16, 2013, in Chicago, Ill., or come to his one-day preconference institute on the Art & Science of Teaching on March 15. 
    • 2013 Annual Conference: Meet the Presenters -- Carol Tomlinson

    • ASCD author Carol Tomlinson discusses "Our Time" and the importance of making the most of every moment. Catch Carol's presentation live at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 17, 2013, in Chicago, Ill. 
    • 2013 Annual Conference: Meet the Presenters, Robyn Jackson

    • Robyn Jackson, ASCD author and ASCD EDge member, discusses "Our Time" -- the current state of education. Catch Robyn's presentation live at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 17, 2013, in Chicago, Ill. 
    • Classroom Instruction That Works Video

    • ASCD's bestselling book is now a video. Watch the preview and find the book and video at http://shop.ascd.org.
    • Wade Boykin: Creating the Opportunity to Learn

    • Wade Boykin, co-author of the ASCD book Creating the Opportunity to Learn discusses the impact of No Child Left Behind on the achievement gap.
    • 2012 Annual Conference: Carol Tomlinson and Marcia Imbeau

    • Authors Carol Tomlinson and Marcia Imbeau discuss why collaboration is important but often difficult and why teaching is sometimes an isolating profession. Catch their presentation at ASCD's 2012 Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 24-26, in Philadelphia.  
    • Annual Conference 2012: Robyn Jackson and Allison Zmuda

    • Can rigor and engagement coexist? In this video, Robyn Jackson and Allison Zmuda discuss some of the myths about teaching and learning. Catch their presentations at ASCD’s Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 24-26, 2012, in Philadelphia, PA!  
    • 2012 Annual Conference: Robert Marzano and Grant Wiggins

    • If you could create schools from scratch, what would they look like? ASCD authors Robert Marzano and Grant Wiggins exchange ideas on the topic in this candid conversation. Catch their presentations at ASCD’s Annual Conference & Exhibit Show, March 24-26, 2012, in Philadelphia, PA. http://bit.ly/nXO1k4
    • Classroom Instruction That Works, 2nd Ed. Trailer

    • The long-awaited follow-up to one of the most important books on teaching, Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Incresing Student Achievement, 2nd Edition, is now available for pre-order in the ASCD Store. It will be released in Jan. 2012. 
    • Classroom Instruction That Works, 2nd Ed.

    • The long-awaited follow-up to one of the most important books on teaching, Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Incresing Student Achievement, 2nd Edition, is now available for pre-order in the ASCD Store. It will be released in Jan. 2012.      
    • A Discussion With Allison Zmuda

    • David Hargis speaks to Allison Zmuda, author of the ASCD book Breaking Free From Myths About Teaching and Learning, about the importance of teachers prioritizing their time and focusing on the ultimate goal of creating critical thinkers.     
    • Create Success: A Profile of Kadhir Rajagopal

    • ASCD profiles Kadhir Rajagopal (Dr. Raja), winner of the California Teacher of the Year 2010 and author of the book CREATE Success! Unlocking the Potential of Urban Students.  
    • ASCD 2011 Summer Conference

    • ASCD's 2011 Summer Conference provides the opportunity to go in depth on four proven approaches -- Differentiated Instruction, Understanding by Design, What Works in Schools and Curriculum Mapping -- all in one place. Join us in Boston, July 1-3, 2011. Learn More
    • What if?

    • View Hannah's channel on YouTube: http://tinyurl.com/hg-youtube
    • Standards-Based Education

    • View Hannah's channel on YouTube: http://tinyurl.com/hg-youtube
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Most Recent Group Photos

    • Student Success Lifecycle

    • Gain, Engage, Retain, and Graduate your Students at a highr rate
    • Analyze using Data

    • Using Data, Engage, Retain, and Graduate your students at a higher level
    • K-12 Solutions

    • Engage, Retain and Graduate your studewnts at a higher level, via these innovative solutions
    • K-12 Portal

    • Engage, Retain and Praduate your Students at a Higher Level via a Portal
    • K-12 Mobile

    • Engage, Retain and Graduate your Students at a higher rate via Mobile
    • K-12 Learn

    • Incorporate Blended Learning into your Classroom
    • 2012 Emerging Leaders and I @ASCD L2L 2013

    • *Individuality*

    • I was inspired to make this picture after having great conversations with amazing educational leaders! 
    • Mentoring Presenters

    • Richard Lange and Mary Elin Barnish
    • ASCD Mentoring Presentors

    • Ami Hicks and Mary Elin Barnish
    • Daoist Musings

    • Daoist Musings

    • Ami and Richard Mentoring Leadership 2010

    • Join the Mentoring and Leadership and Resource Professional Interest Community Group at in San Francisco in 2011.  Stop by on Friday and visit during the Welcome Reception.
    • Mentoring at 2010 Presentation

    • Join the Mentoring and Leadership and Resource Professional Interest Community Group at in San Francisco in 2011.  Stop by on Friday and visit during the Welcome Reception.
    • A Journey Through Differentiated Instruction

    • cain portrait.jpg

    • IMG_2955.jpg

    • A Picture Walk (The Language-Rich Classroom)

    • Get Students "wondering" before you introduce a new content chapter, unit or story.  Do a picture walk and increase engagement dramatically!  "When [teachers] started experimenting with CHATS strategies, they saw instant reults, in terms of students' understanding and engagement.  That enthusiasm just propelled them forward into trying out other strategies... They're able to reach kids that they didn't know how to reach before.  Teachers are feeling empowered" (Dr. Janette Hewitt, Principal, Washington Elementary School).     The Language-Rich Classroom: A research-based framework for teaching English language learners, introduces a 5-part framework toward better teaching, better learning, and bridging the achievement gap (Persida & William Himmele, ASCD, 2009).

Comments




  • Sorry for taking so long to reply - I was on holiday! Sue, the idea of the homework journal sounds very interesting. Did you check each stuents wrote the h.w in her journal before leaving the class?
    Naomi_Epstein, 4 years ago| Flag
  • Here is a different take on differentiating Education...
    Well-Intentioned ‘Race to the Top’ Leaves Only Undifferentiated Teachers Behind:
    Last week’s news read: A national commission says teachers from alternative programs appear no worse—or better—than those from traditional college programs. The reasons for this may easily be summarized as neither program is effective in teacher preparation. Is there a net gain for keeping our teachers bare foot and pregnant?

    There are some great teachers, and even some great Teacher Preparation programs, but these are random occurrences where consistency is essential. The reason is simple: Professional Education is missing fundamental standards found in all other professions. There is no standard curriculum, no sincere effort to identify Best Instructional Practices, and truckloads of weak consultants and players with diluted degrees serving up their own brands of Faculty Development. To be called a profession it is imperative that a profession, one way or another, needs to convene a rolling forum to collect and prioritize the core content of principles and practices that every member ought to know. Ironically, Teachers worldwide are being held to standards for annual yearly progress of their students. Meanwhile, Professors, Learned Societies & commercial schools, and some painfully self-serving non-profit foundations and Universities never even address the need for solid pedagogic content. Worse, those that do publish material under titles referencing Best Practices are quite simply hype, if not fraudulent. The current crop of in-charge “Leaders” dangerously resembles the Investment Bankers who remain in charge of the economic systems that they nearly bankrupted. Perhaps the only way to expose and reform this systemic disaster would be a class action by teachers &/or parents & students against all of us who have been complicit in these myriad layers of self-interest actions bordering on malpractice.
    Since the likelihood of legal action is a remote it would be wonderfully unprecedented for a leveraged agency, such as the US Department of Education to hold a convention of the nation’s leading educators to consider and ideally endorse a covenant of principles and more importantly prescriptive practices ideally on a website that transparently allows these to be challenged, tweaked and further specified for different age-grade-situational conditions. Additionally, such a rolling convention also could address differentiated staffing based on what schools are expected to do, and with a differentiated set of Best Practices for each function, like doctors and nurses, attorneys and paralegals, etc. Schools are expected to carry-on three essential although overlapping functions: 1. Teach new concepts, content and a positive disposition toward self-directed learning; 2. Provide assessment and supervised practice in these objectives; and, 3. Operate a massive custodial role that keeps students in school for at least seven-nine hours a day for about 200 days a year for about 13 years, and now through at least 2 more years of college. Our labor market and economic system depend on schools to meet these criteria at the very least. The problem is not the expectations, but that staffing, and organization do not reflect these three societal essentials. And, sadly there is no free market in which to buy the best ideas and practices. But, this is another complex issue requiring several additional paragraphs that would not begin and end with vouchers and charter schools.
    Meanwhile, please consider joining the websites below offering a potentially startup means of getting the current system moving in the right direction for all who would teach. As an aside, taxpayers would be grateful since increasing classroom effectiveness and adding differentiated staffing could bring about efficiencies that could save billions of dollars with even the smallest degree of adoption. Join the narrative.
    http://teacherprofessoraccountability.ning.com/main/invitation/new?xg_source=msg_wel_network And…http://bestmethodsofinstruction.com/
    Please see too our most recent site for THE PROFESSIONAL TEACHER: : http://anthony-manzo.blogspot.com/2010/05/brief-writing-for-thoughtful-righting.html and right here at: http://www.pbs.org/peerconnection/community/network/peer-connection-30-day-trial/group/rating-teaching-methods-galen-project/discuss/
    Anthony_Manzo, 4 years ago| Flag
  • Naomi--Would a homework journal be helpful here? Perhaps the students can keep a journal that lists each homework item, journal their questions, comments, or random thoughts about it, and receive feedback from you if requested. If the students are in charge of their own homework journal, perhaps they can keep it up. If they know they can use their "journal" as a reference or for study, perhaps that would be an incentive for keeping a meaningful journal. I did a form of this with high school students. They essentially had a year-long learning contract with monthly assignments in a variety of categories. It worked well. Most students learned a great deal during the year. Those who struggled a little were those who habitually procrastinate, but even those students did well because of the collaboration around the work. When a student struggled, they always had the option to ask for help from peers, an outside source, or me.
    Sue_Beach, 4 years ago| Flag
  • Nancy--You made reference to self-made "how to" screencasts in your post. Are you referring to webcasts here?
    Sue_Beach, 4 years ago| Flag
  • Hi Hannah, I tried this out and found that Questia provided access to many articles on subjects I was interested in. Now that I am at a university, my library here provides access to all of these journals without cost--so I no longer use this source. Personally, sometimes I just use Google Scholar and find many things through that source for free---but if you are consistantly accessing articles for research and you are not associated with a university, this is a great way to go.
    Jennifer_Beasley, 4 years ago| Flag

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